Cognitive behavioral therapy

/cog.ni.tive/ /be.hav.ior.al/ 

n.noun

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is a "structured, short-term, present-oriented psychotherapeutic treatment for depression. The main focus or goal of this treatment is solving underlying issues and modifying dysfunctional, unproductive thinking that enables a person to suffer psychologically. By addressing specific, observable actions that are causing harm to an individual, a therapeutic professional assists the individual in creating an alternative strategy for dealing with specified issues.

CBT has proven to be a formidable, effective treatment in treating troubled teens. This type of therapy is effective in treating psychological ailments such as, mood, anxiety, personality and eating disorders. This specialized, behavioral treatment is also thoroughly successful in treating individuals suffering from substance addiction. This is achieved through the abilities of a therapeutic professional and their capacity of accurately addressing underlying issues that may be causing the specific disorders or behaviors. By eliminating the root cause of a negative disorder, an individual is able to finally create separation from the personal affliction, allowing them to further progress into a state of recovery.