Learning styles


/learn.ing/ /Style/
n.noun

Learning styles are different ways that a person can learn. It's commonly believed that most people favor some particular method of interacting with, taking in, and processing stimuli or information. As no one person is the same, their methods of most effectively taking in knowledge should also be unique to the individual. What methods work for certain people, may not necessarily suit the learning needs of others.

Teens greatly differ from one another in terms of learning styles and processing information. Adolescents are living in a time where they are trying to figure out who they are as an individual. During adolescence, teens discover their own unique identity, as a result, teens consequently learn to process information separately from one another. While some teen's prefer learning through reading and studying, others require experiential education to effectively learn new information. Moreover, educating professionals should be well equipped in dealing with individual student's needs, rather than force students to learn through ways that don't suit their specific, learning needs.

Residential treatment centers are aware of the importance of providing troubled teens with unique, effective treatment that best suits the teen as an individual. By offering various methods of learning, teens are able to figure out which type of learning is most effective for their learning needs.